About your Search

20121006
20121014
STATION
CSPAN 4
WETA 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WTTG 2
CSPAN2 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
SFGTV2 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
, history of labor in the 20th century, one of the great triumphs of the civil rights era was for people to recognize -- for white labor to recognize that as long as black laborers were excluded from unions they were undercutting white labor as well. >> it took a while. >> it did. it took 60 years actually. so when you see this kind of cynical advertising, they're trying to use that same ploy using african-americans. and if we had any doubt about the inter-related struggles, let's look at this one issue. how many times have we seen politicians get into trouble because they had nannies who were not being paid or being paid under the tashlgs being exploited. if we look back, we don't have to go to hollywood, we don't -- >> go home. >> look back to the history. half a century ago, that exploited domestic labor would have been black women. >> that's right. >> these are the same struggles. >> absolutely. i so appreciate that. that's part of why next i get to talk about the smartest thing i have read about black folks and the presidency of president obama in four years. we're going to talk abo
and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particularly communities of diversity that we have. i was incre
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
.s. supreme court heard arguments today in the most important civil rights case to come before justices in the past six years. it's a challenge to the use of race as a factor in admissions at university of texas. >> and bay area students are watching this very carefully, and the uc regents are actively weigh inning. marianne favro is live with reaction tonight. >> reporter: here on campus a hearing today is resurrecting the debate over which factors should go into determining which students are aadmitted. it involves abigail fisher, a white woman that applied to the university of texas in 2008. she claims her race prevented her from getting accepted, and she's suing university. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race andette nis he city should not be considered when aapplying to the university of texas. >> reporter: the university of texas standing by it's policy. at san jose state we asked students if they thought race should be considered during admissions. >> it should be equal opportunity for everyone. >> i don't think race should be a factor in admissions because, you know,
and diversity and civil rights. my mama said, you are a democrat through and through. how did you get off the reservation? [ laughter ] >> well, tell us how you got off the reservation. it was a process, obviously. wasn't one thing. tell me a little bit about that process. >> i think like most voters, we are continually being educated. especially if you're paying attention to the dynamic issues we have today, you're examining yourself, because i believe voting today is a head and heart type of process. in 2008 i think most african- americans were really looking at the head, but also at the heart. >> because of the historic nature of the election and all of that. >> history is an emotional heart thing. this was a moment, and this was where my mom truly was. she said, this is the first time that i could ever, ever dream in my life voting for the first black president. i went to work in chicago, and i was also in the clinton administration. first of all, bill clinton, i worked for rodney slater as well, they say remember those who brung you. when hillary was running, i said this is an opport
: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions, warning that the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders, and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer not just black and latino students all students benefit from learning together in the classroom and outside of the classroom. >> reporter: all the courts conservative justices expressed concern over the use of racial prejudice, affirmative action is on the line. the last time the court reviewed this, justice sandra day o'connor speculated race may not be needed after 25 years. >> thanks. in just a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on cbs "this morning." >> the kacht that italian cruise liner that ran around and capsized has been fired. reports say francesco schettino was let go in july for disregarding company policy. he says the charges are unfound and he wants to be reinstated with back p
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
and by the way the civil rights act secured passage for it but democrats have co-opted that narrative and we have got to seize control of that so when black republicans come out and say hey, you know, i'm exercising my first amendment right, we get slammed. we get put back in what i call the black box. and, you know what? i never read the black memo that said i have to be a democrat and it's -- >> -- it's crazy. >> i didn't get that one. >> crystal rice thanks so much for coming in and sharing your experience about. this we appreciate it more "fox & friends" in a few minutes. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communit
: pamela geller with the american freedom defense initiative won the right to hang posters which read, in any war between civilized man and the savage, support civilized man. support israel. defeat jihad. those same posters will be going up at four d.c. area metro stations before the close of business today. already, metro riders here are speaking out against the move. >> because it is not right to gemmize that jihad, the extremist terroristed and generalize the muslims alls this. i don't approve of that at all. >> i think they should be allowed on free speech grounds but i think it is incredibly irresponsible. >> it is kind of a big thing to call somebody a savage but this is america. freedom of speech. >> reporter: metro went to court after receiving what it called verifiable threats over the poster and out of concern over the recent riots in islamic nations over a california film ridiculing the prophet mohammed. >> even though you have a right to say it, doesn't mean you have to say it. >> i believe that even though it might be going up in the d.c. area, other countries will look a
reelect president obama. because the stakes are too high. but the forward movement, we saw gay rights. we need to stand up and say we're not secure with the escalation of drone wars or violation of civil liberties. there has to be a movement from people. i'm worried about austerity issues that you raised. you can look at europe, but if you see balancing the budget which i believe is not the short term objective. it shouldic to end joblessness in this country. you will see the balancing of the budget on the backs of working class people, the poor, who have had to bear the suffering of wall street and have not shared in a recovery which is slim but beginning. >> eliot: what you're saying is hugely important. i'm fearful right after the election there will there there will be institutional pressure to solve the fiscal cliff and what they see is the looming deficit that that suddenly all the entitlement programs will be on the table. >> and gives us back in let's be pragmatic, a recession or we're slowly coming out of. but i'm worried about the secret dark money. it may move from the presiden
about if they decide to retry the cases and what about the possibility of civil lawsuits? this could be a lot. >> wow. all right, susan in new york, appreciate it. thank you. >>> new developments today in the shooting that killed a u.s. border patrol agent. the fbi now thinks he may have died by friendly fire. the 30-year-old man was shot and killed this week in arizona. officials initially said he and his colleagues who were wounded in the incident, came under fire after responded to a sensor that went off, but authorities say the only shell casings found at the scene were those belonging to the agents. >> you know, investigators have made progress into the investigation, into agent ivy's death and are looking into the possibility that it was a tragic accident, the result of friendly fire. the fact is the work of the border patrol is dangerous. all of us who wear the uniform know this and yet this special breed of men and women willingly put themselves in harm's way to serve their country and to protect their communities. against those who wish to do us harm. >> that news comes as h
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)